Thursday, January 17, 2013

Semipalmated Sandpipers (well, actually NOT)


One of the best parts (in my mind) of writing a blog is the education I've gained from researching what I'm writing about. Today, I learned that these birds, which I had ID'd as Semipalmated Sandpipers, are actually Sanderlings. A big thank-you to professional bird photographer Mia McPherson for pointing out an easy way to tell the difference when both birds are in their similar non-breeding plumage: The shape of the end of the bill (check out the photo below to see the heavier, bulbous end compared to a Semipalmated Sandpiper's narrow, finer bill).

So... here's my original post, edited to reflect the correct bird ID. Thanks again, Mia!

Some of my favorite birds to watch while we were out east in October were (NOT) the Semipalmated Sandpipers but rather Sanderlings. From the house we could look out at the shore and see all these bright white butts sticking up in the air. Then they'd scurry around and run back in toward the water line, butts once again up in the air as they dug out tasty snails and teeny crabs. (this is apparently a trait that Semipalmateds do not exhibit often, but Sanderlings are constantly scurrying back and forth)


Another easy way to tell the difference between Sanderlings and Semipalmated Sandpipers is that Semipalmated have a hind toe that is easily visible. These Sanderlings, as shown above, do not.

These birds were on their way from their breeding grounds in the arctic tundra and Hudson Bay, to their winter grounds in Central America and coastal areas all around South America.
 





10 comments:

  1. Beautiful photos. I am always learning from my fellow bloggers

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    1. Thanks, Dawn. We're so fortunate to have a great community of bloggers out there.

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  2. They are so cute, great shots! Glad you got shots that show what to look for. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. They were fun to take, Eileen. Thanks for the nice note!

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  3. Great shots, P.R. has many sanderlings, just out on the more isolated beaches.

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  4. Outstanding photos! I've been birding for quite a few years now and still misidentify birds more often than I want to.

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    1. I think the hardest thing is that I don't always know what to compare birds to, when trying to make IDs. Frustrating but so glad all of you are out there for reference help. Thanks much for the compliment and for visiting, Larry!

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  5. While on vacation in Florida I often see these busy little birds zipping up and down the beach. Wonderful photographs! Shorebirds can be difficult to identify. I too have learned a lot from fellow bloggers.

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    1. Thanks so much, Julie. You always seem to know the right things to say :-)

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